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Year 6 Planning: Links to the 2014 National Curriculum Programs of Study

Plan Reading Teaching Objectives Writing Teaching Objectives Spelling Teaching Objectives Grammar Teaching Objectives Text Type

Jacqueline Wilson
Author
  • To continue to read and discuss an increasingly wide range of fiction, non fiction and reference books or textbooks
  • To understand and use the terms 'biography' and 'autobiography' and evaluate the usefulness of biographical information from different sources
  • To note and develop initial ideas drawing on reading and research
  • To use further prefixes and suffixes and understand the guidance for adding them
  • To use morphology and etymology in spelling
  • To recognise vocabulary and structures that are appropriate for formal speech and writing, including subjunctive forms
  • To use passive verbs to affect the presentation of information in a sentence
  • Biography
    Autobiography

    Earnest Shackleton
    Polar Explorer
  • To distinguish between statements of fact and opinion
  • To continue to read and discuss an increasingly wide range of fiction, non fiction and reference books or textbooks
  • To read books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of purposes
  • To identify how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning
  • To compare how writers from different times and places present experiences and use language
  • To develop the skills of biographical and autobiographical writing in role, adopting distinctive voices, e.g. of historical characters through a blog
  • To make notes and arrange events on a timeline
  • To revise features of a recount and first and third person
  • To spell words with ‘silent’ letters
  • Recount

  • To identify how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning
  • To identify and discuss themes and conventions in and across a wide range of writing
  • To make comparisons within and across books
  • To revise and identify the principal features of different fiction genres
  • To understand that the spelling of some words needs to be learnt specifically
  • To use modal verbs or adverbs to indicate degrees of possibility
  • Narrative

  • To identify how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning
  • To identify and discuss themes and conventions in and across a wide range of writing
  • To make comparisons within and across books
  • To compare how writers from different times and places present experiences and use language
  • To revise and identify the principal features of different fiction genres
  • To use a range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs
  • To understand that the spelling of some words needs to be learnt specifically
  • To use modal verbs or adverbs to indicate degrees of possibility
  • Narrative

  • To select appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning
  • To use different styles of handwriting for different purposes with a range of media, developing a consistent and personal legible style
  • To assess the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing
  • To use a range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs
  • To understand that the spelling of some words needs to be learnt specifically
  • To link ideas across paragraphs using a wider range of cohesive devices: repetition, grammatical connections and ellipsis
  • Narrative

  • To identify and discuss themes and conventions in and across a wide range of writing
  • To make comparisons within and across books. To be able to compare characters, settings, themes and other aspects of what they read
  • To summarise the main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph, identifying key details that support the main ideas
  • To discuss and evaluate how authors use language, including figurative language, considering the impact on the reader
  • To participate in discussions about books that are read to them and those they can read for themselves, building on their own and others’ ideas and challenging views courteously
  • To explore characters, their conflicts and dilemmas and extend pupils’ response to stories
  • To identify the audience for and purpose of writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own
  • To learn the conventions of different types of writing
  • To link ideas across paragraphs using adverbials such as ‘on the other hand’, ‘in contrast’, or ‘as a consequence’; and to show the passing of time
  • Narrative

  • To consider how authors have developed characters and settings
  • To identify and discuss themes and conventions in and across a wide range of writing
  • To make comparisons within and across books
  • To be able to compare characters, settings, themes and other aspects of what they read
  • To summarise the main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph, identifying key details that support the main ideas
  • To discuss and evaluate how authors use language, including figurative language, considering the impact on the reader
  • To participate in discussions about books that are read to them and those they can read for themselves, building on their own and others’ ideas and challenging views courteously
  • To explain and discuss their understanding of what they have read
  • To select appropriate grammar and vocabulary, for writing, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning
  • To use a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs
  • To assess the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing
  • To note and develop initial ideas
  • To learn the conventions of different types of writing
  • To use paragraphs to structure narrative, shifting for a change of mood, scene, time
  • To link ideas and the passing of time, across paragraphs, using a wider range of cohesive devices
  • Narrative

  • Poetry